Tag Archives: young adult

My online library

My attempts to post a little bookshelf at the right of screen (to show what I’ve been reading) have failed so I have opted for Plan B – Blogroll links to LibraryThing.

For those who have asked what I read and recommend, please click WHAT I’VE BEEN READING in the Blogroll box in the right-hand column. I will tag all Young Adult, Junior Fiction and Children’s Books so that you can search these categories. I’ve now also added a Books for Boys tag in response to queries from parents and schools I have spoken to.

NB: I’ve opted to use LibraryThing rather than some of the more commercial-focused, social or book networking sites. Why? Because I love libraries and can see the benefits of this site for librarians around the globe.

Why YA?

The Young Adult (YA) category of novel didn’t exist when I was a kid. Sure, there were plenty of books that would have been categorised YA if they’d been published today but mostly it was just kids’ fiction or fiction for everyone else. Depending on your reading level in the upper primary school years, you’d be switched over to ‘adult’ fiction and never look back. Not any more. YA means there’s another (optional) rung in the ladder before you climb to the adult end of your library.

From a bookshop point of view, I guess separating out books for tweens and teens is about consumer convenience. If you’re shopping for yourself or a friend in the YA zone, you’re much more likely to find what you’re looking for – and quickly. From an author’s point of view, YA can be a two-edged sword – mainly because you’re less likely to be stumbled across by an adult reader!

I aimed to write a YA or “crossover“* novel because I felt comfortable with YA voices and felt my story was about young adults. I’m rapt it has struck a chord with young adult readers but I’m also chuffed to have had great feedback from readers as old as 97. To my mind, a good story is a good story and it doesn’t matter what section of the bookshop you find it in. Good stories resist age groups because they entertain everyone.

I also write YA fiction because I enjoy reading it (and most other fiction). And, despite my calendar age, I still see myself as a youngish adult.

In future posts I’ll write about some of the YA fiction that I’ve really enjoyed.

*NB: For the uninitiated, “crossover” novels are those that are seen to have market appeal to grown-ups as well as young adults. Examples include the Harry Potter series; the Tales of the Otori series by Aussie author Lian Hearn; The Book Thief and The Messenger by another Aussie author, Markus Zusak. These titles all come highly recommended by me!