Tag Archives: influences

Remembering Rick (& The Young Ones)

I used to love the BBC series, The Young Ones, possibly because of the time it exploded into my life. During a year when I was fully immersed in HSC (that’s the vintage VCE) study stress and adolescent unrequited love angst, it was a welcome 30-minutes a week of shouty, rude, politically incorrect, violent, stick-it-to-the-man, anarchic comedy mayhem*. Just what every teenager needed.

My brother went completely fan boy. He perfected the sneer and dressed as Rick for a costume party. He owned the Cliff Richard single on vinyl, the etiquette book and Neil’s Heavy Concept Album. The book, with its section on How To Use Hyphens (to make better insults), gave us hours of fun.

And so the sad news this morning of the death of Rik Mayall prompted this detour down memory lane. I figure a spot of Googling is the least I can do to acknowledge the impact Mr Mayall and his mates had on my teen years.

Please find below, via IMDB, a snippet of the script from the Cash episode in Season 1, along with a clip of the people’s poet in action.

*If you’re new to the Young Ones, consider yourself warned.

 

Neil: Guys, guys, guys, I think I’ve solved our money problem. I’m writing to my bank manager. See what you think…”Dear Bank Manager.”

Mike: Yeah?

Neil: Well, that’s it. I’m quite pleased with it so far, though.

Mike: Oh, well, it’s a strong opening, certainly.

Vyvyan: I don’t like the “dear.” Sounds a bit too much like, “Will you go to bed with me?”

Mike: Well spoken, Vyvyan. What do you think instead?

Vyvyan: Uh, what about…”darling?

[everyone concurs]

Neil: [writing] “Darling Bank Manager…”

Rick: No, no, no, no, no, not “Bank Manager,” it’s far too crawly bum-lick. Tell it like it is, put “Fascist Bullyboy!”

Neil: “Darling Fascist Bullyboy…”

Mike: That’s nice, yes, so far so good. So what do you want to say?

Neil: Well, basically, I want to ask him if I can have, like, an extension on my overdraft, but I know there must be a better way of putting it than that.

Mike: Well, what about, “Give me some more money”?

Vyvyan: …”You bastard!”

Neil: Don’t you think that’s a bit strong?

Mike: Ah, Neil, people like that respect strength.

Neil: Yeah, you’re right. Uh, “Darling Fascist Bullyboy, Give me some more money, you bastard…” Uh…”Love, Neil.”

Vyvyan: Not “Love, Neil”! That sounds far too much like, “Come and get it like a bitch-funky sex machine!”

Neil: Yeah, you’re right… Uh, what about, “Yours sincerely”?

Rick: Oh, come off it, Neil. If you’re going to be that sycophantic, why don’t you go ’round there now and stick your tongue straight down the back of his trousers?

Neil: Oh, look, I know, I know, why not “Boom Shanka”? It means, “May the seed of your loin be fruitful in the belly of your woman.”

Mike: He’ll never understand “Boom Shanka,” you’ll have to write the whole thing out.

Neil: Right, okay, here we go. “Darling Fascist Bullyboy, Give me some more money, you bastard. May the seed of your loin be fruitful in the belly of your woman, Neil.”

Rick: Well, if that doesn’t work, I don’t know what will.

 

Books of influence

Think back through your life. What books have left an indelible mark, good or bad, on your soul? Was there a novel you were forced to digest at school that put you off reading forever after? Is there a non-fiction title that led to an epiphany about your true calling? Did a self-help publication rescue you from a dark place? Is there a work with an unmatched ability to transport you from from the humdrum to a place where you can shed your burdens and relax?

These books don’t have to be your favourites. They don’t need to be great literature, either. They just need to have made an impact that echoes within you today. They might be books you can’t bear to throw away, even though you haven’t picked them up for decades. And they could be the titles that stay on your bedside table so they’re always within reach.

Here are a few that helped make me who am I am, for better or worse, and the reasons why:

Tintin & The Red Sea Sharks – Herge
This was the first graphic novel I laid eyes on. The fact that I can still remember finding it in the Yarram library – a hardcover comic felt like a forbidden fruit – is proof this book spiked the Richter scale of my years. I’ll never know whether I ended up a journo because of the adventures of the unstoppable boy reporter but I have my suspicions.

Asterix the Gaul – Goscinny & Uderzo
I moved from Tintin to the Asterix series, which revel in punning and wordplay. During my early tabloid newspaper days I was a rampant punster in inappropriate places. I think the two Frenchmen and their translators are to blame.

To the Wild Sky – Ivan Southall
This novel was young adult before the genre existed. For reasons I’ve detailed elsewhere, it could have led to my becoming an author. Even if it didn’t, it was one of the first books that helped me understand the power of story. And it was Australian, unlike most of the Blyton-esque stories I grew up with.

The Chrysalids – John Wyndham
Wyndham specialised in sci-fi that could be happening in your own backyard. I devoured many of his books. This title made me think what it meant to be different, accepted and able-bodied. It raised questions I hope to explore in my next novel and it certainly led me down a path into social justice journalism.

To Kill A Mocking Bird – Harper Lee
This could be filed with the titles above and below it, under the heading ‘Injustice’. Reading novels such as this, even as compulsory school exercises, made me aware that there are times when you need to speak out, no matter how unpopular that might make you. I was reminded of this courtroom drama recently, when reading Chloe Hooper’s excellent and upsetting The Tall Man.

A Kindness Cup – Thea Astley
I did a unit on ‘justice’ in either Year 11 or 12 and this was one of the set texts. It was certainly the first I’d heard of massacres of indigenous Australians. The injustice evident in this tale has stayed with me ever since and influenced my years at university and as a newspaper journalist.

1984 – George Orwell
Also school reading. At some level I think this made me realise the people in power don’t necessarily deserve to be there and should be scrutinised and held accountable for their actions.

Shogun – James Clavell
One of the towns I lived in as a teenager had a mobile library visit fortnightly in a semi-trailer, adding to the exotic appeal of any space full of stories. Thanks to that truck I dabbled with Stephen King, James Herbert, Ian Fleming and other authors that the librarian cocked an eyebrow at. This Hollywood-esque saga was the first time I was so completely transported to another culture to experience adventure, honour and sexuality. I’ve probably read it three or four times since.

A House for Mr Biswas – VS Naipul
I tackled English literature at university and didn’t exactly love it. There weren’t many books I had to read that I enjoyed. I’m not even sure I enjoyed this one but I’ve never forgotten it. It led me to other titles such as Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children and The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy. When I first had the chance to travel internationally it was India I ventured to.

The Art of Happiness – The Dalai Lama with Howard C. Cutler
One of my friends remarked that this book taught him to be a man and how to deal with anger. I wouldn’t go quite that far but I would say it has made me think about who and how I want to be.

Thank you to the lovely Julia Lawrinson for prompting this post in her blog.

Incidentally, last year I did a Facebook 15 Books in 15 Minutes list, with a slightly different brief … and came up with a slightly different catalogue. If I were to list authors that have influenced me, that would be a different list again. Maybe that’s a challenge for another post. In the meantime I’d love to hear about books that have left a mark on the inner you.