Tag Archives: Game as Ned

International Ned

Further to the ripper review I highlighted yesterday, I can offer an exclusive peek (link below) at what Game as Ned looks like in its Polish format.

I don’t speak Polish so I have no idea what this page says – but it’s intriguing to see how my book has been presented overseas. I wonder what the Polish readers make of a story featuring an Australian bushranger…

To check out the Polish cover design, click here.

I once had the opportunity to meet pioneering YA author Ivan Southall whose books influenced me as a child (and still do today). Ivan had a bookshelf full of every edition ever published of his books. There were Russian, German and even Japanese editions of his very Aussie tales. Very cool.

My words, someone else’s mouth

My seven-year-old son is a little young to read Game as Ned, much to his frustration. But, with a long car trip imminent, I agreed to let him listen to the audio version of the book with me – thinking I could skip over any of the more confronting parts of the story.

On the road, with my wife and daughter asleep, I put the first CD into the car stereo. Within moments my words were trickling from an actor’s mouth. I had goose-bumps.

When you write a novel you can expect to read it, rewrite it, reread it and so on, many, many times. By the time you’re done, you’ll probably know some of the passages off by heart. Indeed, one friend told me that “when you reach the stage you can’t see the words on the paper any more, it’s time to hand it over to someone else”. I know that sounds odd, but when you have read the same words umpteen times, your brain stops seeing them properly. There might be a blatant spelling error but you’re no longer capable of seeing it.

Anyway, hearing the first chapter of the Game as Ned audio book felt like a stranger was speaking inside my skull. By the second and third chapters I’d switched to listening to the actor, and how he skillfully interpreted the different characters. Then a really odd transition occurred.

Somehow, the editor switch was flicked on in my brain. I started listening to sentences and paragraphs and thinking “that line jarred” or “I’ve overused that word” or “I could have written that better”. It was another reminder that reading your writing aloud is one of the best ways to differentiate between passages that work and those that need more polish. After onscreen and then paper edits, a verbal read through is vital.

if you’re interested in the GAN audio book, please contact Louis Braille Audio.

On the road

During my time as a newspaper journalist, I became familiar with writing articles that generally had a very short shelf life. You soon learn that today’s news is tomorrow’s food for the compost worms. When you write a novel, the experience is very different. A book takes on a life of its own the minute it is published. Where and when it will make an impression is almost impossible to predict.

So it was a fantastic surprise to hear from Albion Park High School in New South Wales where an entire Year 9 class had just read Game as Ned. I received handwritten letters from each student and the feedback was blunt and brilliant. Thanks guys. You made me laugh (and my wife cry.)

I hope to be having more to do with schools as GAN becomes better known. With this in mind, I’ve signed up with the speakers’ agency Booked Out where I’m humbled to be on the same list as scores of much better known and comprehensively published wordsmiths than me.

I spent time recently with five classes of grade 1/2 students from my son’s school and, once again, was blown away by the enthusiasm of the kids and their wacky, obtuse questions. (For the record, my favourite colour is still green.) I’m also scheduled to chat to Year 9 students at Braemar College soon and join a Ned Kelly-themed panel at the Melbourne Writers’ Festival. August is going to be action-packed!

Speaking of MWF, if you have read Game as Ned and want to learn more about how I tangled bushranger fact and fiction together, please join me at Federation Square’s ACMI Cinema 1 on August 25 at 10am.